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Too late again


Aha, more cotton fields.  But those big white bales show we have just missed our chance to see an unpicked field.

Comments

  1. Are they bales of the fluffy white bits ... sorry for the technical terms ... I have never driven through cotton country ... my daughter is a lawyer specialising in water allocations ... she cannot talk specifics with us, but many of her clients are up that way.

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    Replies
    1. Yes the fluffy white bits are gathered from the plants and wrapped up into bales similar to those big round hay bales.

      Bits of white stuff seem to blow off the bales as they are being transported to the cotton gin, leaving white traces along the side of the road during the harvesting season.

      I took a close up of the bales last year here http://sweetwayfaring.blogspot.com.au/2012/08/cotton.html

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    2. Ahha ... saw that link ...

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  2. Well it still looks interesting. It looks like your driver is like mine. He can never find a place to stop for a shot.

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    Replies
    1. Diane, since you live in Queensland that is not surprising. The roads are narrow and have very steep sides (probably to carry away the much heavier rainfall you have).

      Ian usually does photos stops for me in NSW but I don't even ask most of the time in Queensland. I am also reluctant to do so when we are towing a van as that makes finding a safe place to pull up more complicated.

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  3. Can you imagine picking cotton by hand?
    Those thorny, sharp pods?
    It's probably still harvested that way in many countries.

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    Replies
    1. A field full of cotton to hand pick ... what a daunting task!!

      I reckon it would make you appreciate your clothes and mend them rather than throwing them out in no time like we do these days.

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