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Popular poplars (1 of 3)


Polars at not native trees but are popular in the farmlands. They don't colour well in the mountains (perhaps it is too misty and damp) but over the hills they go glorious golden so I was on a mission to get at least one good shot.

Musing:
From The Poplar by Richard Aldington
"I know that the white wind loves you,
Is always kissing you and turning up
The white lining of your green petticoat.
The sky darts through you like blue rain,
And the grey rain drips on your flanks
And loves you.
And I have seen the moon
Slip his silver penny into your pocket
As you straightened your hair;
And the white mist curling and hesitating
Like a bashful lover about your knees.


Comments

  1. Brings back memories of the row of poplar trees that lined the highway north of Kempsey. Not there any more, and they would have been waterlogged now if they were. Mybe they got water logged too many times & that's why they were removed.

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  2. Poplars are lovely trees and are often seen grown as windbreaks. Quite a few dot the road from Goulburn through to Canberra. I guess the are tall and dense and effectively block the wind sending it up high. Don't know.

    This is lovely countryside. I am so looking forward to the weekend. Don't mind if it rains. Not sure about it being bleak though ...

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  3. Well, I'm arriving at the beginning having already seen the end. they are lovely, lovely trees.

    As for the poem, the imagery is so rich and sensual. I can hear them tittering in the breeze.

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