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Lake Canobolas


Coming down from the mountain we made one last discovery on the way home, Lake Canobolos which is just outside the city of Orange. It's a lovely picnic area that reminds me of Canberra. I guess it was the lake, exotic trees beginning to show their autumn colour and the golden sunshine.

Comments

  1. And parts of Centennial Park ... and even of Hyde Park in London.

    Very nice and refreshing for the senses and the soul ...

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love the composition, the place and also the lake's name! Is it an aborigene word?

    ReplyDelete
  3. JM, yes it is. I found the folling interesing background from an Orange City Council website.

    The name Canobolas is derived from the Wiradjuri word meaning 'two shoulders'. It was a significant water reserve not only for local Aboriginal people but after white settlement for travelling stock. Snow often dusts the peak in winter. Locals say there is a permanent cloud over the mountain.

    Water feeds from Towac Creek into Lake Canobolas, once known as Meadow Creek, Orange's first water supply. The lake is one of Orange's major attractions, popular year-round for excursions and only a few kilometres from the city. There is no better place to enjoy Orange's changing seasonal colours than the lake, with Mount Canobolas looming not far away. There are many orchards in the fertile area surrounding the lake as well as a number of wineries.

    I am going to show one of the orchards on my next trip.

    ReplyDelete

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