Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Chatting


The normally busy cafe at Sofala was nearly empty.  We struck up a conversation with a gnarled old local with a long beard who had popped by to drop off some stuff. A finely dressed old gentlemen came in an ordered a sandwich.  His story was a fascinating one of starting work as a lad in the shale oil mine at Glen Davis. Its such fun talking to strangers, like a lucky dip.

This gate is at Sallys Flat which I have added as a locality at 100 Towns.

9 comments:

  1. The best part of travel is talking to random strangers. But it can also be the WORST part!!!

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    1. Grin. I haven't come across too many people that I don't like talking to but then again I usually leave the chatting to my husband and go inside the van and play with my computer.

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  2. I was hoping for more Hill End shots. I spent some of my honeymoon there and it was simply amazing. We traveled from Bathurst to Hill End on the 'Bridal Track' (irony here), have you been on that road, bit scary in parts but one of the greatest drives I have ever done.
    Terrific old gate.

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    1. I have actually visited Hill End lots of times and done reports in the blog so decided to keep it short and sweet this time. Back in the past I used to label posts as hill end district so click on the link and you will see not only HIll End but Sofala and the Bridle Track.

      The Bridle Track is a stupendous drive (and yes scary in parts). But there was a big rock fall in one section a year or so ago and that section of the road has been closed indefinitely so it is no longer a through road. I am hoping to go and explore the parts that are still open again soon.

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    2. Enjoyed looking at all the shots. Sad to hear the Bridal track is closed.

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  3. There used to be a show on SBS or the ABC where this fellow just rocked up to strangers in the street and started chatting with them. Eventually the most extraordinary stories would come out and usually from the most nondescript looking people. Just goes to show - everyone has a story!

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    1. I missed that show. I wonder what I would start yabbering about if someone from the TV show grabbed me in the street.

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  4. I like how encounters in the country can be so interesting since people are generally so unguarded. I don't find I have that many conversations like this in the city.

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    1. Certainly people are more ready to chat in country towns and caravan parks than in the city. I do remember when I first moved from the country to the city that I used to talk to people, on public transport and stuff. Soon realised that was not the done thing.

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