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Cameliers


We're back at Bourke cemetery to participate in the Tuesday Taphophile Tragics meme.

At the cemetery there is an old mosque, transplanted to the cemetery from elsewhere in the town to preserve it.  It is placed near the Afghan graves.  Afghan cameliers played an important part in transportation through the remote arid country in Australia.


Comments

  1. Is that the mosque, in the background there, with the verandah? Hah! I bet it is the only mosque in the world that looks like that.

    I am glad it is there, though. I wonder why they thought it might be preserved better in the cemetery. Probably because progress would bulldoze over the top of it in the township.

    If Bourke has progress ...

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    Replies
    1. Yes the funny little building is the mosque. You can understand why it would be at risk of being demolished if left in it's original position. I guess it was though that being along side the graves was a good way to preserve. They are clearly proud of their historic cemetery.

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  2. Great picture. Interesting that it was moved for preservation.

    Beneath Thy Feet

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  3. Interesting! And nice photo!

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  4. i like that angel.
    interesting mosque indeed!

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  5. This IS different from everything we have here. Wonderfully composed shot.

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