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128 wheels


Man it was noisy at the caravan park, big trucks going past day and night.  Between animals and mines there is a lot of stuff being transported to and fro.  But the one that had us must intrigued was this giant mining thing parked in view of our caravan window.

It was parked there for a couple of days. I jokingly said they must have a flat tyre and couldn't figure out where it was. It had 8 wheels on each axle and 16 axles!

It turned out they couldn't move because of the recent rain.  This made the sides of the road soft and if you meet one of these on Queensland's narrow roads,  you are the one that has to get off in the mud.

After a few days of dry weather they moved off at 6am on our last day. Two trucks pulling it, one truck pushing it and an escort of police cars.  Amazing stuff.

Comments

  1. There are certainly lots of big vehicles out there in the bush. That one is really a monster.

    ReplyDelete
  2. That sure is a monster. I wouldn't like to meet it coming the other way. I hate that when you get a camp site next to road. Even though we don't camp but use cabins. It happened to us once at Roma. Since then I always try to find parks that are not situated on the main road and ask for a cabin far away from roads. Sometimes they quibble about it if it is only for one night.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Wow!!!! That thing is huge...

    ReplyDelete

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