Sunday, November 14, 2010

The sad story



Terowie was known as a break-of-gauge town. Remember I wrote about the different railway gauges. Rolling stock on one gauge obviously can’t use the another gauge so where the two different gauges meet every single item --  parcels, livestock,  wool bales, wheat, minerals and passengers had to be transshipped from one train to another.  It was a huge operation and the town had a thriving population of 2000 supporting this.  In 1969 the broad gauge was extended to Peterborough and in 1970 the narrow gauge line was closed. Almost overnight the population fell to a mere 150 people.

All the stockyards, loading systems and other paraphernalia were removed and now just a few sad railway buildings remain and the shops of the town are closed but preserved more or less like they were the day they shut their doors.

7 comments:

  1. A sad story indeed.
    How strange it must have felt to wander around those empty streets while taking your photos. Some of the shops look in such fine condition too. Such a shame it's in decline. Some of the remaining population are obviously looking after things, and preserving their memories, as the streets are so clean and tidy.

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  2. Last September my wife and I drove from our home in Tulsa Oklahoma to Santa Fe New Mexico following old Route 66 as much as is still possible. Many small towns along that route made their living from the traffic which passed through. Now they are a collection of abandoned motels, repair shops, and cafes. But in all these places there are still a few hardy souls who still inhabit these little towns. There are Terowies in lots of places like dusty little museums.

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  3. As I usually do when I look at your posts, I go over to google maps and have a virtual wander around the town.
    This town was soooooooo dry looking.
    You really can understand how people in dry areas get so excited about rain. It really is transformational (is that a word? transformative?).
    It's amazing that a bit of green grass and new growth on trees can make such a difference.

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  4. But there are still living 150 people there?

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  5. It's a sad story indeed. However I would love to visit one of your ghost towns as it would be totally new for me and I have no idea what the feeling might be.

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  6. I wonder who maintains the town in its 1970 condition. Do you have to pay to wander around?

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  7. It is listed so locals with govt aid I guess. It is a real town not a museum piece. Just rather empty and not decaying and vandalized to the ground.

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