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Coolah


We decided to spend a few days at Coolah a small country town (population 800) in the Warrumbungles region. We passed through here last year and planned to return to explore further.

Coolah is described as nestled in a picturesque valley of undulating hills and river flats 420 kms north-west of Sydney.  Because there are no major regional towns in the area, and no major roads pass through it, the Coolah region is said to be very quiet, safe and bucolic.  It's also the gateway to Coolah Tops National Park.

In this series you are in for an overdose of rural scenery because I love undulating land. We will walk the Road that Beckoned in the town. But first of all let's go drive to the National Park where it should be no surprise that we will see trees.

Comments

  1. Agree Coolah is a lovely town, but it's a long time since I've been there.

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  2. Looking forward to this as I haven't been here.

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  3. Another place I've been meaning to visit because of the national park.

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  4. I've never been to Coolah, although I always love that part of the drive up to Qld between Gilgandra and Coonabarabran.
    It's the prettiest country.

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  5. There's something about avenues that really enhances the streetscape - what a shame some councils are removing all non-native trees irrespective of the consequences.

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    Replies
    1. I noticed that that on one side of the street there are camphor laurels and was wondering if they would be destined for the wood chipper.

      I was told that the council is going to remove the willows from the river bank, which would seem such a destructive thing to do because they look lovely but actually it is the willows that are being destructive --they break up the banks and silt the river and branches breaking off and floating downstream make more willows in no time.

      It's a matter of making sensible choices I think.

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  6. Is Coolah the home of the black stump?

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    Replies
    1. Yes it is. But there are other places around the country with black stumps so I took the story with a grain of salt and didn't even go look for it.

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