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Cullen Bullen


The next place with pass through is the small town of Cullen Bullen (the name apparently means Lyre Bird in the local aboriginal language.)  It started as a stopping place on the road to the gold fields at Sofala and Hill End and later thrived through coal mining.  But today is a small town of around 200 people with only the Invincible mine still in operation.  But no matter how small it is it's important, after all it's home to a Royal Hotel.

With all this talk of mining you might be getting the wrong impression of the scenery.  You don't really see the mines.  It's grazing country as well as extensive native forests, not much industry or cropping.

Comments

  1. That is surprisingly ungreen. Was it last Spring when you were thinking of buying?

    I have only been up that way once in my adult memory, but loved the area.

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  2. Haven't been through this area before. Looks like a beautiful place.

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  3. Julie, he grass is beginning to set seed so is beginning to ungreen at the moment ... I noticed that too. This was taken in December after we bought.

    Winam, it is lovely country to drive through.

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  4. it is good that the scars of mining are not seen.

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  5. The mountain looks beautiful, even being (almost) bald.

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  6. Just love the name Cullen Bullen ... it rolls off the tongue. Lovely meaning too!
    Was the General Store full of goodies like local crafts and jams etc?

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  7. Susan, I have never stopped at the general store. Now you mention it I must rectify that situation sometime soon.

    JM, I love the mix of forest and cleared land on this trip ... there is a pleasing balance.

    Diane, yes there a few mining scars to be seen from the road ... but truth is I find big open cut mines quite awesome.

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