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A wish


Then we came to the listings for Dad's old squadron and we all stopped while he bent down to read the names. He straightened up and said in a odd thick voice, "I never knew what happened to some of those men."

Dismayed I looked up at the tears in his eyes. I'd never seen my father cry. In my childish way I understood that Dad had a very important wish ... that it should never happen again.

In the classroom I argued, "We have to remember so we don't forget."

Sadly the wars go on. This photo was taken at the end of the hall where names are still being added today.

Comments

  1. That's exactly what my Mum used to tell me.

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  2. "... where names are still being added today." It's a beautiful post despite the sad reality at the end.

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  3. That would have been a very moving moment for you Father - and a very poignant moment for you - to see the tears in his eyes and perhaps to glimpse a little of the tragedy of war.

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  4. That attached photograph amply illustrates the intimacy of your memoir.

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  5. A touching and personal series Joan, thank you. Your photographs are very good.

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